Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice / Legal Issues in Criminal Justice
Utica College

Program Details

Criminals continue to advance their techniques through technology, as well as skate the edge of legal loopholes, taking advantage of non-existent or loosely-defined laws. You’ll find the issues related to criminal justice span the globe, entering the homes and business of its residents in a physical and virtual manner, threatening homeland security, and demanding immediate policy changes to protect the innocent and prosecute the guilty.

The online BS in Criminal Justice – specialization in Legal Issues in Criminal Justice curriculum prepares you to:

  • Describe the roles of ethics in the operation of the criminal justice system
  • Identify and resolve ethical dilemmas associated with crime control with critical thinking
  • Demonstrate knowledge of cybercrimes, including computer crimes, internet fraud, e-commerce, and threats to the national infrastructure
  • Demonstrate knowledge of policies, legal issues, and investigative techniques and strategies, as well as implications for investigation and enforcement on a global scale
  • Have an understanding of criminal law in the United States with emphasis on how the Constitution affects the criminal studies system and the people in it
  • Demonstrate knowledge of criminal law for disputing settlements and maintenance of order by the state with an emphasis on legal reasoning and process
  • Learn the laws governing the behavior of individuals and their accountability to the international community and states
  • Learn enforcement mechanisms for piracy, war crimes, and terrorism

Requirements

Bachelor completion requires 120 credits, including transfer credits.
Must have an associate's degree, or have earned a minimum of 57 credits from an accredited institution prior to enrolling in the program.

  • Minimum GPA of 2.5 or higher
  • Official transcripts
  • Resume
  • Other application materials as requested

School Accreditation Statement

Middle States Commission on Higher Education