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Master of Science in Industrial Engineering

Program Details

The online MS in Industrial Engineering degree program from Kansas State University is designed for students who possess a bachelor's degree in engineering, mathematics, or a physical science and who are versed in several of the basic areas of industrial engineering. Graduates are equipped with the mathematical, scientific, and analysis skills necessary to solve complex business problems in a number of industries. Potential career paths include, but are not limited to: 

  • Data Analyst
  • Industrial Engineer
  • Logistics Engineer
  • Production Manager & Consultant
  • Supply Chain Manager
  • Quality Engineer

Requirements

Students must travel to campus once at the end of their program for an oral examination.

  • Bachelor's degree in engineering, mathematics or physical science and be versed in several of the basic areas of industrial engineering (non-industrial engineering undergraduates may be required to take six semester credit hours of prerequisite courses)
  • An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 in the final two years or approximately the last 60 credit hours
  • A score of 750 (old scoring system)/159 (new scoring system) or above on the quantitative portion of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE); GRE scores are not required for students who have completed an undergraduate degree from an ABET-accredited program
  • Industrial engineering graduate students are expected to have a proficiency in: computer programming (equivalent to K-State's CIS 200 or CIS 209), linear programming (at the level of IMSE 560) and statistics (at the level of STAT 510/511), as these classes are prerequisites for two of MSIE’s core courses
  • Statement of objectives
  • Names and emails of three professional and/or academic references who will provide letters of recommendation
  • Resume/curriculum vitae
  • Unofficial transcripts from each institution attended

Accreditation & Licensing

North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, The Higher Learning Commission