Colleges with Open Curriculum

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  • Last Post 29 January 2012
E-LearneronBudget posted this 29 January 2012 - Last edited 24 February 2016

It is my understanding that if an individual wants to earn a degree in the United States, there is a requirement of General Education classes, such as Math and English, regardless of degree, and regardless of state, is this correct?

Are there any online, legitimate, degree opportunities that are located outside of the United States so that an individual that is gifted in Math does not miss out on earning a degree simply because that individual can not pass the required English class that is required in the United States? A

lso, what are the costs of degree programs outside of the United States?

Is it true that in the 1960s or 1970s, in the United States, a degree could be earned by taking degree specific classes only (example: A math degree student only had to take math classes - no English classes were required)?

If this is true, why was it changed?

Thank you.

1 Comments
VickyPhillips posted this 29 January 2012 - Last edited 06 August 2015

Hello E-Learner:

You are 100% correct. The American college degree system is structured so anyone who seeks an accredited degree -- whether online or campus -- will be required to take the majority of their college credits/courses OUTSIDE their major area.

A typically bachelor degrees requires 40 courses YET only about 10-15 of these courses will be in one's major area. The rest of one's courses must in math/science, English/literature, the humanities, the social sciences and then general electives.

Accreditation often requires that the degree be structured this way.

In contrast, the UK/European degree model does NOT use this liberal arts structure by and large. In England if you study for a bachelors in history you READ and take exams largely about history.

If you attend a European/UK open university you will be able to side step the American course diversity requirement.

Try any of these mega world class open universities for more info:

University of South Africa http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UniversityofSouthAfrica

The British Open University http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenUniversity

The Australian Open University System http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/OpenUniversitiesAustralia

Many Europeans and Asians are studying through the Australian system bcs costs tend to be low and quality quite high. You can explore any of these world-class open universities as they do take students from the USA.

Let us know if you do decide to go global. There is certainly a great deal of choice. The great mega open universities of the world enroll many-many more online students than colleges in the USA; and most global mega open universities are low in cost as they are public entities. I am not sure how they would compare to degree costs in the USA if you are a USA resident but I am interesting in hearing back from you on this issue so others can consider this option.

Happy Studying! Vicky

E-LearneronBudget wrote: [quote]It is my understanding that if an individual wants to earn a degree in the United States, there is a requirement of General Education classes, such as Math and English, regardless of degree, and regardless of state, is this correct?

Are there any online, legitimate, degree opportunities that are located outside of the United States so that an individual that is gifted in Math does not miss out on earning a degree simply because that individual can not pass the required English class that is required in the United States? Also, what are the costs of degree programs outside of the United States?

Is it true that in the 1960s or 1970s, in the United States, a degree could be earned by taking degree specific classes only (example: A math degree student only had to take math classes - no English classes were required)? If this is true, why was it changed?

Thank you.[/quote]